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FAQs

/FAQs
FAQs2018-10-26T07:09:43+00:00

General FAQs

What does it take to be a Coyote Trails instructor?2018-07-29T07:23:47+00:00

All Coyote Trails Instructors:

  • Are at least 18 years of age.
  • Have taken the Fox Trail, or have tested out with equivalent skills & knowledge.
  • Show passionate interest in advancing their own skills, (one way is by engaging in the other trails of study)
  • Understand long-term cultural mentoring, what it takes to mentor each and every learner in a class and also have a working knowledge and felt sense of what it is like to be mentored
  • Show passionate interest in evolving as a better teacher
  • Worked on Instructor Teams as an Instructor-In-Training with CTSN (for at least one season)
  • Have attended CTSN staff training at a minimum of once every two years.
  • Have a working, usable understanding of ‘Coyote Teaching’ and its effectiveness

Qualities of a Coyote Trails Instructor:

  • Passionate about wilderness skills, teaching, and learning
  • Personable and articulate
  • Enjoys working with kids and adults
  • Supports light-hearted teaching environments
  • Teaches with humility
  • Takes initiative
  • Conflict resolution and safety prevention skills
Are you set up for special needs students?2018-07-29T06:38:05+00:00

We do have diverse learning group trained staff and offer programs specifically for students with special needs. We provide a safe and compassionate environment to nurture your children’s growth.

We can accommodate most needs for any class we offer. We encourage you to speak directly with us and welcome all of your questions so that each individuals needs may be professionally met. Please phone us at your earliest convenience.

Do you have driving directions to the Coyote Trails Nature Center?2018-08-02T15:57:57+00:00

The center is located in the heart of the US Cellular Community Ballpark at 2931 South Pacific Highway, Medford, Oregon. Once inside the park, follow the signs to the center.

Northbound on 1-5:

Use Exit 24 (Phoenix Exit)

Turn Left onto Fern Valley Road from the freeway off-ramp. Proceed 0.5 miles. Turn Right onto Hwy 99 at the stop light. Proceed 1.6 miles. You’ll pass the traffic signal at East South Stage Road. In one block, turn Right onto the U.S. Cellular Community Park road, just before the Harry & David Field sign. Follow as the road curves; the second road (not driveway) on the Right will lead you to the Coyote Trails parking lot on the Left.

Southbound on 1-5:

Use Exit 27

Turn right at end of offramp, onto Garfield St. Proceed 0.4 miles. Turn Left onto S. Pacific Hwy (OR-99). Proceed 1.7 miles. You’ll pass the Grange Co-op. Just past Les Schwab Tires you’ll see a Harry & David Field sign on the left. Merge left into the left turn only lane. Immediately past that sign, turn Left onto the U.S. Cellular Community Park road. Follow as the road curves; the second road (not driveway) on the Right will lead you to the Coyote Trails parking lot on the Left.

Questions? Contact Us

Do you provide scholarships?2018-09-05T08:19:06+00:00

Yes – Coyote Trails believes in offering these teachings to everyone who seeks them. Our Board of Directors works year-round to ensure proper scholarship funds exist and we do our best to help all who need assistance. Please print an Application for Financial Assistance
and return it to us promptly in order to be considered for aid, our scholarships are on a first come first served basis. You may also inquire about a payment plan.

How are skills developed at Coyote Trails?2018-07-29T06:38:27+00:00

We learn through the experience and adventure of new things. All instructors at Coyote Trails School of Nature are trained in the art of living within the wilderness. Together we will learn a grander appreciation of the natural world around us and attain higher levels of self-reliance and confidence in the outdoors.

tree So what are Primitive Living Skills? These are the skills needed to be able to walk out into the woods, build a shelter, find safe water, create a fire and locate good food. All the things you would need to not just survive but thrive in the woods, or for that matter, anywhere you find yourself. We still need shelter, water, fire and food but today we just turn a knob, walk in the door, flip a switch and open the fridge. However, not so long ago our ancestors had to master these skills and adapt them to whatever terrain they may have traveled across. At Coyote Trails School of Nature we find that by reintroducing these skills we open doors to new ways of learning and opportunities to reconnect with the natural world.

Nature Observation: You’ll be shown how to observe nature on a deeper level and learn the basic philosophy of holding a positive outlook in any given situation. Skills will include silent movement, understanding bird language, the means of camouflage, and the methods for becoming one with your surroundings. You will learn how to immerse yourself in the natural world.

Tracking: You will learn the basics of tracking, including track identification and analysis, track dynamics, animal markings, scrapes and chews, sign tracking, scat identification, the proper use of resource field guides and how to follow an animal’s trail through all substrates.

Wilderness Living – The following wilderness skills will be covered:

  1. Shelter: techniques for constructing the debris hut, wicki-up, thatching, mud hut, cave dwelling, and pit dwelling.
  2. Water: finding water using a solar still, sink hole, plants, and various other water gathering methods.
  3. Fire: making a fire using primitive methods including the bow drill, hand drill, as well as how to build a proper fire.
  4. Food: finding food from both plants and animals found in North America ranging from desert to mountain terrain. Collecting, preparation, and cooking will be covered, though in the interest of conservation only a sampling of such food will be prepared.

Tools: making stone tools, cordage, bow drills, spears, digging sticks, cooking utensils, bowls, and many more.

trapTrapping: trapping animals using primitive snares and deadfalls. No animals will be harmed or trapped during the course, but participants will understand how to build and set traps and will practice non-lethal methods for a better understanding of the techniques.

Tanning: the primitive ways of tanning a deer hide; brain tanning, and making rawhide, as well as many useful items that can be made with a hide. Due to safety concerns, no brain will be used in the tanning of hides. Students will gain the knowledge and experience through alternative methods.

Wilderness Ethics: The peace found through wilderness and the caretaker approach to living in balance is discussed as the underlying philosophy surrounding all of the skills taught and learned.

How do I donate to support Coyote Trails?2018-07-29T06:38:35+00:00

Secured by PayPal

To donate by mail, send a check to:
Coyote Trails School of Nature
2931 South Pacific Highway
Medford, OR 97501

Coyote Trails provides free professional assistance for Estate Planning and Legacy Gift Giving.
Contact us for details – we will be happy to arrange a meeting with you.

How do I sign up to be on your email list?2018-07-31T14:14:21+00:00

To receive the Coyote Trails newsletter, you can sign up right here!

After signing up, you’ll receive an email to confirm your subscription.

Newsletter Signup

How do I volunteer with Coyote Trails?2018-07-31T14:16:48+00:00

Would you like to volunteer and share in a rewarding experience? Fill out a volunteer application today!

We offer day, week-long, or entire summer volunteer programs at our semi-remote wilderness campus and/or at the Coyote Trails Nature Center in Medford, Oregon (including helping to maintain the trails, landscape, cleanliness of Bear Creek and more). This is a worthwhile opportunity to experience our positive learning environment and to gain insights and first-hand knowledge in nature-based education skills! Equally, any student who has successfully graduated from a particular class is welcome to apply as a volunteer the next time this same class is offered. These spaces fill early so not all who apply will be accepted. Additionally, you must be at least 14 years of age to volunteer.

It’s our volunteers who help make the difference. We sincerely appreciate all the positive help from our dedicated and professional volunteer staff.

Thank you!!

Volunteer Application
Long-term programs for individuals2018-07-30T17:51:57+00:00

Long-term programs available for school requirements, individuals, and homeschool groups. Applications required. Contact our office.

Program Title Grade Level Topic Length Max Number Dates Offered
The Way
of the

Caretaker
Graduated high school or 18 years of age. Traditional living skills and caretaking. Continual study over time. Year-long. Multiple seasons 7 Year-long (contact office for projected dates)
Volunteer: Nature Center 9th-adult Non-profit office assistance, grounds assistance None N/A Spring, Fall, Winter
Summer Internship 9-12th Traditional living skills & teaching. Must take Fox Trail prior to or summer of; required to live on site. Minimum 4 weeks none Summer only
Practicum and Projects 9-12th,
College +
Traditional living skills, caretaking, long-term school project Multiple seasons 16 Spring, Fall, Winter
What books and support materials do you recommend?2018-07-31T14:26:19+00:00
  • For preschool through early elementary: Picture books by Joseph Bruchac.
  • For young elementary children and early readers: “One Day in the Woods” by Jean Craighead George and all picture books by Byrd Baylor such as “I’m in Charge of Celebrations.”
  • For older elementary and middle school ages: “The Light in the Forest” by Conrad Richter, “Hatchet” and “Guts” by Gary Paulsen; “Geronimo” by Joseph Bruchac; “The Education of Little Tree” by Forrest Carter; “My Side of the Mountain” and “Julie of the Wolves” by Jean Craighead George and absolutely her new “Pocket Guide to the Outdoors” based on “My Side of the Mountain.”
  • For high schoolers: “Ishi, Last of His Tribe” by Theodora Kroeber; “When the Legends Die” by Hal Borland and “Tracker” by Tom Brown Jr. “What the Robin Knows” by Jon Young; “Illustrating Nature” by Irene Brady.
  • DVD’s: “Alone in the Wilderness” by Bob Swerer Productions. “The Great Dance” by Jeremy Evans.
  • For Adults: The movie, “The Great Dance” by Jeremy Evans; “Practical Tracking” by Liebenberg et al; “Animal Tracking Basics” by Young & Morgan; “Grandfather” by Tom Brown Jr.; “What the Robin Knows” by Jon Young; “Tracking and the Art of Seeing” by Rezendes; “Wesley the Owl” by O’Brien.
What is your application and acceptance process?2018-07-31T14:29:00+00:00

We believe our programs work best and have the most positive effect on participants lives when students return year after year. Therefore, we try to give priority to our returning students. We begin to allocate spaces for our summer programs by March of the calendar year for which you are registering. Classes book early so please plan accordingly. If classes are full or you are not accepted, we will refund your deposit.

What jobs are available with Coyote Trails?2018-08-01T14:03:58+00:00

Coyote Trails’ curriculum is designed and implemented as the most advanced learning experience available. We do not compromise on innovation, performance, or appeal. Nor do we compromise our commitment to hiring and developing the best from around the world. We work in small, focused teams which, much like our teachings, are agile, efficient, and focused on excellence. We are driven by work that contributes to a global impact and are passionate about our future in the educational industry. The pace is fast, the work is stimulating, the structure is limited, and innovation is expected. Do you question tradition and constantly think of ways to improve the status quo? Do you thrive in environments where brilliance is common and a challenge is the norm? Do you have a strong passion to teach? Are you excited by challenge because you’re amongst the best in your field? If so, you’d be in good company at Coyote Trails School of Nature.

What does it take to become an instructor with Coyote Trails?

If you would like to work in a highly rewarding and positive atmosphere, please contact us.

Camp Headwaters

Head Cook/Nutritionist

Applications for a full-time summer head cook/nutritionist are due by February 1 of the present calendar year. If you want to work and live in a semi-remote wilderness camp, apply by contacting us. This is your chance to turn your outdoor passions into a career.

Responsibilities and Duties: The Cook/Nutritionist’s position is to facilitate with all meal preparations, order and organize all necessary food and supplies, and help serve meals. The nutritionist assists the staff and organizes the volunteers in clean-up, and ensures all kitchen related activities are carried out safely and in a sanitary manner.

Qualifications: The Cook/Nutritionist needs previous food preparation experience for groups of 45 or more and needs to obtain an Oregon Food Handlers permit. A current certification in CPR/WFR is a plus. To be considered, excellent organizational and communication skills and sanitary habits are key.

Instructor

Full-time instructor position applications are due by March 1 of the present calendar year. To apply you need to have graduated from at least the clickFox Trail Adventure” class. Please contact us.

General Responsibilities: Instructors teach primitive skills, crafts and lead activities by example and personal experience. They are directly responsible for the well being and actions of the students under their care. The instructors monitor the health, learning environment and all key issues that the students are experiencing at any given time. Instructors maintain the ongoing role-modeling that is so crucial to the development of student’s abilities during their stay at Coyote Trails.

Qualifications: Previous experience working with ages 7-21 in a wilderness skills program and experience with the teaching of ecological principles and related philosophies; experience of living as a positive role model and the ability to communicate clearly and effectively with the ability to supervise volunteers; basic knowledge of wilderness skills and crafts and the ability to demonstrate and hold a strong foundation of ethics and morals. Must be at least 18 years of age and have a current Wilderness First Responder or equivalent backcountry medical training.

Intern

Here you get to test your skills, be directly mentored by the instructors and staff, and really push your learning limits; all in a highly positive and rewarding wilderness camp environment. Position priority fills on a first come basis.

“Four Seasons – Year Long Caretaking”: Applications are due by February 1 of the present calendar year. The next open position begins the first of June. If you have always wanted to practice and live the Earth skills then contact us to arrange for a personal interview. Graduated students from clickThe Trails of Study” receive top priority.

* Coyote Trails accepts employees from all walks of life, of any gender, race, religion, sexual preference, or ethnic background. We accommodate those with disabilities to the best of our ability. Please consult with us and/or your physician if you have questions.

Who do you accept into your programs?2018-07-31T14:53:28+00:00

Coyote Trails accepts students from all walks of life, of any gender, race, religion, sexual preference, or ethnic background. We accommodate those with disabilities to the best of our ability, however, due to the strenuous nature of some activities, not everyone can attend. Please consult with us and/or your physician if you have any questions.

Overnight Class FAQs

Are there people I can contact who have sent their kids to Coyote Trails?2018-07-31T14:58:51+00:00

Yes, we have a list of parents who have agreed to be a reference. They have had children come through our Coyote Trails programs and some have also participated as adults. Please notify us directly if you would like to contact our parent references directly.

Read recommendations from parents

Can I send mail to my child while at camp?2018-07-31T15:00:38+00:00

Yes! As our locations vary depending upon the class, we provide mailing information for you once your child is registered.

How can parents participate?2018-07-31T15:09:18+00:00

A unique aspect at Coyote Trails School of Nature is our focus on families. Knowing the importance of family, we provide the environment for a parent, grandparent or guardian to attend with their children.

This positive experience together produces lasting results where the parent and child continue to grow together long after they have returned home. This not only gives the adults an incredible experience of their own, but it provides them with the chance to reconnect with their child in a deeper way without the everyday distractions that encroach upon our daily lives. For grandparents, we also touch on “the role of the elder” in today’s society. Join us as a family, sign up your teenagers, or come as an adult. We promise a rewarding experience in wilderness skills, nature study, storytelling, art and the underlying philosophy connecting us to all things. Our programs range in length from day programs to six month internships. First-time family participants begin with the Family Fox Trail Adventure.

Parentsparents

How do I contact my child in case of emergency?2018-07-31T15:11:11+00:00

You will be provided with an emergency contact number to reach us at our camp location. This information and all other pertinent materials are provided with the student/parent handbook which is mailed to your home address upon registration.

How do you handle emergencies in Oregon?2018-07-31T15:14:17+00:00

The safety of everyone at Coyote Trails School of Nature is of utmost importance.  We have a trained EMT on staff and all instructors are trained in emergency medical assistance and CPR.  We are also fortunate to be able to conduct our courses close to one of the most well respected medical communities in the Northwest.

If a participant needs to go to the emergency room, The Asante Ashland Community Hospital is the closest hospital. 

If your child is in need of special assistance or daily medication, please consult with our medical director on staff. We are happy to accommodate you and any of your child’s special needs.

How do you handle it if my child gets sick?2018-07-31T15:16:14+00:00

All of our staff are trained in first aid and CPR. We also have staff trained who are Emergency First Responders and our Director is an Emergency Medical Technician with an extensive medical background. We have a professionally stocked Medical Tent facility where anyone can rest and minor injuries are treated as needed. If an illness persists, parents are directly notified as per your instructions on your child’s medical form. Details provided upon registration.

How do you handle students on medications?2018-07-31T15:18:06+00:00

The health director will meet with you and your child during registration. You will need to bring all medications in their original prescription containers with detailed instructions directly from the students prescribing doctor, along with your permission authorizing us to administer them. Coyote Trails takes health and safety very seriously. We have a trained EMT on staff and a professionally stocked medical tent on site.

How do you keep my child safe?2018-07-31T15:19:44+00:00

Safety is the number one priority at Coyote Trails. Adult supervision is provided at all times. We keep a properly maintained medical tent and an EMT on staff. All instructors are trained in medical emergencies, natural disasters, and a host of extensive modern day scenarios, as we take your child’s safety very seriously. At all times instructors carry radios and medical packs with your child’s specific medical forms located inside. In fact, this is why you receive two medical forms to fill out upon registration. One form remains in our primary medical tent and the second travels in the medical pack that is with your child at all times.

Coyote Trails is proud to maintain its excellent record of yearly health department inspections and all current insurance related inspections and licenses, including thorough background checks on all staff.

How will my child be transported to and from camp?2018-07-31T15:21:28+00:00

You are welcome to drive into camp yourself. If you are flying, transportation is provided by Coyote Trails to and from the airport to our main camp. On the last day of class, most parents pick up their child and tour our campus to share in the weeks memories; otherwise we provide return transportation to the airport. Detailed logistical information is provided upon registration.

I’m worried that survival skills are too hard core for my children. Is the experience about learning skills or toughing it out?2018-07-31T15:23:32+00:00

Coyote Trails is a School of Nature. The intent is to provide safe opportunities for people of all ages to reconnect with the Earth through primitive living and awareness skills. If you are looking for an endurance test or a form of individual physical challenge to see how much you can take, this is not your school.

Is financial assistance available and how do I apply?2018-07-31T15:27:59+00:00

Our mission is to assist all in obtaining equal access to these teachings. As a public non-profit, we survive on donations alone. For those in need of assistance, we encourage a convenient monthly payment plan. Every effort is made to offer Aid Packages to those families in need of assistance. If you are interested in a class but are unable to meet tuition, please read and return the Financial Assistance Application. We will promptly get back with you.

Each year, financial assistance is on a first-come, first-served basis. So our advice is to return them as soon as possible upon registration of a course.

What about showers and personal hygiene?2018-07-31T15:29:32+00:00

We have private solar showers available for students. All students wash their hands before every meal as a  part of our normal routine.

What gear should I bring?2018-07-31T15:38:56+00:00
Double debris hut

Double debris hut at the Bear Den Camp in Oregon

Since all of our week-long programs are held in a semi-remote wilderness camp you will need to attend with the following REQUIRED items:

  • Personal tent
  • Warm sleeping bag (temperatures can easily fall below 32 degrees even during summer)
  • Sleeping pad
  • Ground cloth or tarp for under tent
  • Water bottle (to be carried at all times)
  • Eating utensils (plate, cup, bowl, and silverware)
  • Re-usable lunch bag/container
  • Toothbrush, toothpaste, brush or comb
  • Soap, shampoo (biodegradable only please)
  • Other toiletry items as needed – contact lens solution, etc.
  • Raincoat or poncho
  • Jacket or heavy wool sweater
  • Two pairs of shoes, sneakers or boots (one to stay dry, one to get wet)
  • Long pants (preferably not cotton)
  • Swimsuit
  • Towel
  • A 3-5 inch, sharp, non-folding, sheathed knife (with signed parental approval if under 18)
  • Bandana
  • Wool cap or hat
  • 1 pair synthetic long underwear top and bottom
  • Insect repellent
  • Sunscreen
  • 5’x5′ section of mosquito netting (available at most fabric and outdoor stores)

Optional/Recommended:

  • Wool blanket
  • Camera and film
  • Notebook and pens
  • Journal
  • Reading materials
  • Stationery, stamps and mailing envelopes

Please Do Not Bring:

  • Any Electronics (radio, MP3 player, video recorders, etc. – cell phones permissible)
  • Anything that cannot get wet or dirty
  • Valuables
  • Soft drinks or any other high content sugary drinks
  • Candy

If possible, we recommend a hydration pack so each participant can carry his or her water at all times. Dehydration at some of our camp elevations is common. We supply many items in our Coyote Den School Store, let us know what you need and we will glad to help.

What if my child wants to stay for two or more classes/weeks?2018-08-01T16:23:08+00:00

There is a weekend bridge program that is run by Coyote Trails staff that will allow your child to remain in camp from Saturday to Sunday. It is often a time to relax, journal, explore and play. There is a minimal charge for the bridge program which covers student’s laundry and weekend meals. Details provided upon acceptance into your classes.

What is the adult/student ratio at your camp?2018-08-01T16:25:23+00:00

It varies in regards to the course that is being offered. At times it is a low as 1 instructor per 2 participants. It has never gone over a 1 to 5 ratio.

What is your cancellation policy?2018-08-01T16:28:25+00:00

Notification of cancellation needs to be received ten (10) days prior to the first day of your class in order to receive a full refund minus a $25 processing fee per transaction. No refunds are issued if cancellation occurs within ten (10) days of your class.

What is your medication policy?2018-07-31T15:40:36+00:00

The health director will meet with you and your child during registration. You will need to bring all medications in their original prescription containers with detailed instructions directly from your child’s prescribing doctor, along with your permission authorizing us to administer them. Coyote Trails takes health and safety very seriously. We have a trained EMT on staff and a professionally stocked medical tent on site.

What kind of child will love this camp?2018-08-01T16:30:49+00:00

No experience is required to come to our introductory classes. We have found that any child who is curious about the natural world will love our camps. We are looking for kids who love to explore nature and are passionately seeking answers. Students who are not afraid of dirt and love dancing in the rain. Those that live for the next discovery. These kids have great imaginations, a wonderful sense of play and an innate passion for the Earth. The Coyote Trails experience is more about personal growth than external achievements. Most of our students return each summer and some eventually enter our intern training program.

What kind of food is served? Can you meet special dietary needs?2018-07-31T15:49:52+00:00

Our head chef ensures that hot, healthy organic meals are provided three times a day. We adjust for all types of dietary needs including but not limited to vegetarian and gluten-free diets. There is no need to bring extra food or snacks. The meals we serve are an integral part of our “Trails of Study” curriculum and continually receive high praise from our students and parents.

Click to read a news article about our food!!

When should we apply? How will I know if my child has been accepted?2018-08-01T16:34:28+00:00

All application materials are contained within this website. It is best to apply as early as possible to reserve your space. Coyote Trails will notify you when your application is received and you are accepted within two weeks of applying. Follow-up information will be sent directly to you once accepted.

Where do we sleep at night?2018-08-01T16:37:47+00:00

Our basecamp is purposely kept simple to develop a sense of community and closeness to the Earth. Everyone, including staff, stay in tents. You will need to bring your own. Parents sometimes share tents with their children but it is also a great time for your children to start building their own sense of independence by living in their own tent next to yours.

Will my child be able to contact home if they wish?2018-08-01T16:39:19+00:00

We encourage participants to stay in the moment while in camp but if your child needs to touch base with you while at camp, that can be arranged. Cell phones cannot be charged at camp and cell phone use is not encouraged. Most young students have little or no desire to call home during the week. Other technology, such as computers, the internet, etc. are purposely not available.

Will students need spending money?2018-08-01T16:41:01+00:00

We do have a Coyote Den school store where t-shirts, field guides, nature books, healthy snacks and gear can be purchased. A spending limit form is supplied in the follow-up information packet once you are registered and accepted.

School Program FAQs

Does Coyote Trails offer teachers training seminars?2018-07-31T15:56:56+00:00

Coyote Trails offers special weekend Teachers’ Training Seminars as well as in school classroom visits. It is in the expansiveness of Nature that students come alive and learn to listen what is being said between the words, to see the space between the leaves, and to embody a new way of learning. Our experience and feedback from both public and private school teachers has been remarkable. Students learn to interact with each other outside their usual classroom setting and dynamically engage each other, resulting in a much more productive and receptive student.

Training Seminars

Nature connection education is crucial for all teachers. Nature connection helps students in a myriad of ways by providing inspiration, motivation and focus. Connecting to the local landscape allows students to write, experiment, synthesize and evaluate curriculum in a hands-on manner. Just using some of the simple and quick techniques learned through Coyote Trails School of Nature can ignite student passion and fuel learning in a very deep way.  Please don’t take our word for it – read some our teacher’s letters of recommendation.

What is the success of our curriculum through your schools, Coyote Trails Adventure Club or our frequent visits to your class?

“Nature connection is a permanent and daily exercise utilized in our program. The result has been increased interest in the class, increased awareness, and most importantly an increase in student vitality. When combined with sit-spot journaling we have seen an increase in writing scores on state assessments.” – Jason Imbrognio, Middle School Teacher

Education Programs2018-07-31T15:59:56+00:00

Courses and Classes

All of our classes are available for public school, private school/groups, charter school, and homeschool groups. Class series available for all topics.

This is a generalized list of the types of classes we provide. We customize each program for each group, & account for the time of year (for example: Edible & Medicinal Plants class will be different in winter than it will be in late spring). In general, we try to keep a small age range for a group in order to provide the best learning conditions for the students, but we are willing to work with groups who have a larger age range as well.

Program Title Grade Level Topic Length
Wilderness Navigator! K-12 Compass, survival, and landscape study 1-4 hours
Survival Science! K-12 Shelter, water, fire food: science keeps you alive! 2+ hours
Tracking 4-12 Animal tracking, movement, and identification 1-6 hours
Earth Art K-12 Baskets, cordage, flint knapping*, dyes, natural crafting 4+ Hours
Fire I 2-12 Matches, strikers, and fire structure. 2-4 Hours
Fire II 5-12 Steel and flint, bow drill, hand drill, tinder bundle 2-4 Hours
Shelter K-12 Debris hut, structure and science 2+ hours
Early Civilization 5-12 Food prep/cook, keeping camp, hide tanning*, water purification 3-6 Hours
Edible & Medicinal Plants 8-12 Edible, native plants, and medicinal uses 1-2 Hours
Evolution of… 6-12 Hunting or fire technologies through time 2-4 Hours
Awareness studies I 5-12 Intro to awareness, wilderness movement 1-4 Hours
Awareness studies II 7-12 Advanced landscape awareness and movement 2-4 Hours
Little Foxes @ School K-1 Nature exploration, introduction to skills 1-4 Hours
Visual Journaling 9-12 Multimedia documentation of experiences and memories 2-4 Hours
The Art of Thrival 7-12 Comfort crafting: seats, mats, baskets, keeping camp 2-4 Hours
Leadership: Practices for Self 9-12 Introduction to mentorship, learning to work in a team 2-4 Hours
Movement and Awareness K-12 Natural movement, early human and landscape studies, ecology 2-4 Hours
Wilderness Safety & Survival 6-12 Lost-proofing/navigation, intro to survival, basic first aid (no certification) 2-6 Hours
Traditional Handcrafts 8-12 Baskets, cordage, flint knapping*, natural crafting 2-5 Hours

Estimated Costs

Adjusted for number of students & program length. If additional preparation and/or materials are required, there will be additional costs. Joint grant writing opportunities are available; contact us with your specific class needs.

Day Classes (for groups of 5 or more students):
1-2 hour workshop: $6- $20 per student
3-5 hour workshop: $10 – $35 per student

Small Group Day Classes:
Classes for groups of less than five are priced on a sliding scale of $20- $65 per student for a 1-5 hour class

Day Camps:
$145- $260

Weekend Overnights
$195 – $295

Weeklong Overnights
$675 – $1599

Extended Overnight classes (2 weeks-1 month)
$1200 – $4700

Class Prices vary depending on number of students, cost of materials, length of class, travel costs, etc. To schedule a class with us, or to get an exact price quote, contact our Program Coordinator at Katie@CoyoteTrails.org or 541-772-1390.

Amanda and Kids inspecting nature

Also brought to you by CTNC: Project Feeder Watch

For more information on Private Skills Mentoring, contact our office!

How can teachers continue the CT lessons after the field trip or experience is over?2018-07-31T16:02:44+00:00

Working with the Program Coordinator at Coyote Trails to design specific ideas of things you can do with your students after the field trip or school visit will help to continue building the excitement and learning.

Providing the students with questions after the class (even a week or two after the Coyote Trails visit) can help to trigger recognition & use of academic language as well as solidify comprehension of the skills that were taught during the visit. Example questions to pose to students:

  • What was the most memorable part from the Coyote Trails class we did? Why do you think you remember it best?
  • List everything you can remember learning that day. Include illustrations.
  • Do you have any questions about what you learned that day? Please list them.
  • What skills from Coyote Trails are you most likely to continue at home?

Tests, project ideas, and discussion prompts can be created by the Program Coordinator at Coyote Trails based on your specific class experience. These will also help to reinforce academic language and state standards that were covered during the visit.

We also recommend that your class log into our website and sign up to be a part of “Central Fire” where members can post reflections, experiences, and observations from learning in nature. By having an authentic audience for students to share what they have learned (such as through Central Fire), students will be motivated and proud to demonstrate and continue the learning that has taken place.

Also ask about materials, resources, and further reading students could do if you are interested.

Consider doing a group debrief in which students have a space to share their experiences, whether it be in a project or a group discussion.

Do some written reflection for yourself about how the trip went.

  • Where were the holes in your awareness?
  • Were there things you could have done to better prepare?
  • Did the instructors cover all the learning targets?
  • Do students have remaining questions?
  • Would you do the trip again?
  • What were the highlights?
  • What feedback would you give the instructors?
  • Were your expectations realistic?
  • Was this an overall effective trip? Why?

Send feedback to our office so that we may gain a better understanding of how our work has impacted the community, your students, and schools. This feedback helps us improve and can help us receive funding in the future!

To get started planning your trip, or if you have any questions during the trip planning process, contact our Program Coordinator at 541-772-1390.

How will my class be managed – groups, chaperones?2018-08-01T13:12:35+00:00

Coyote Trails will always communicate with you ahead of time about what the lesson plan and activity will be and if it will be a whole class activity or small-group oriented such as rotating stations. If small groups are needed, we will suggest the size needed and ask you to plan those groups ahead of time.

Chaperones are great because it lowers the student/adult ratio, allowing our instructors to work closely with the students and be available for those who need extra help and support.

Prepare chaperones for their role. While they should engage in the activities, chaperones should be prepared to assist in transitioning students, helping facilitate restroom and lunch breaks, doing head counts, and being overall responsible for the well-being of their groups. Let them know your needs as a teacher for the trip.

If your class will have volunteer chaperones, they can be observers or be participants as you see fit. Coyote Trails specializes in working with all ages and families including children, parents, and grandparents. Activities can be organized with chaperones in mind.

How will students with disabilities or emotional concerns have their needs met?2018-08-01T13:02:25+00:00

The outdoors provides a unique opportunity for students of all backgrounds to shine. In order to create the best learning opportunity possible for all of our students, it is important for us to know ahead of time about any special needs that should be addressed. Although our instructors are experienced in addressing a variety of needs amongst our students, no one knows your student better than you. We are open to suggestions or insights regarding the needs or behavior of a particular student. At Coyote Trails, we know that consistency and structure provide a sense of security for many students, and we have instructors with extensive training and certification in regards to special needs students. Please feel free to ask us specific questions ahead of time.

Tips for chaperones2018-09-05T08:04:20+00:00
What are some tips for a successful field trip?2018-08-01T13:44:19+00:00

Field trips have been a vital part of education for as long as humans have existed. Experiencing the “real world” allows students to connect to the ideas in the classroom and provides a new environment in which to process their own understanding. Now while field trips facilitate natural study and are super fun and effective, they can be overwhelming to coordinate. This is a mini-guide that is not meant to be a complete guide, but a snapshot of some things to consider when planning your trip with Coyote Trails!

Some Tips for Successful Pre-Planning:
  • Identify and clearly state your learning targets. This will help you get comfortable with your own class’s needs and get you thinking about what background knowledge would be helpful to your students. Check out our resources for pre-planning here.
  • Work with your contact at Coyote Trails and discuss possible pre-survey/pretest questions that will get students thinking about their own questions, wondering about the topic, and questioning their own understanding of the background knowledge.
  • Consider having students draft 2-5 questions they already have about the topic before the day of the trip/visit. Challenge them to have the answers to all their questions before leaving the site.
  • Discuss your expectations of behavior and learning before the trip. Consider having students come up with the conduct guidelines. If the trip will have a related project afterward, give the students the rubric before the trip to get them thinking.
  • Remind students to wear appropriate clothing! Outdoor Education means outdoors. We will be out in the field rain, shine, or snow. Nature is great to experience when it’s sunny, but there is an incredible amount to learn from rainy and chilly weather too
  • Also provide students with a packing list. Lunches, extra shoes, gift shop money, journal, pencils, and worksheets are all common things students could need and might forget.
  • Prepare chaperones for their role. Chaperones, while they should engage in the activities, should be prepared to assist in transitioning students, helping facilitate restroom and lunch breaks, doing head counts, and being overall responsible for the wellbeing of their groups. Let them know your needs as a teacher for the trip. Check out our Chaperone-specific guide.

Be able to identify all of the following for yourself and to your administration:

  • Learning outcomes for the trip
  • Standards alignment
  • Essential concepts underlying the content and structure of the trip
  • Key vocabulary that will be a part of the trip
  • Who are the chaperones?
  • Cost of trip and how it is funded
Talking to your contact at Coyote Trails:
  • Use vocabulary, terms, academic language, and ideas from your learning targets so that we can use them when talking with students. Mention them directly if they are essential.
  • Make sure your contact knows that you are aiming to meet standards, and provide them early in the planning of your class.
  • Ask your contact for alignment charts if it would be helpful in your class selection and planning. This can help when talking to your administration as well.
  • Give and receive detailed time information: length of program, bus schedule, departure and arrival times, etc.
The Trip:
  • Check in with bus drivers about departure and arrival and travel times. Double check directions.
  • PARTICIPATE! Understanding the students’ experience will help you to create more effective post materials, debriefs, discussions, and follow-up questions.
  • Students will remember how they felt more than anything; make it fun!
  • Be available to help with “the container.” While our instructors are great at keeping big groups contained, it helps when someone who is familiar with the personalities and learning styles has an eye out for likely spin-off students.
  • Have a way to transport all of the following. Do not leave it on the bus 🙂
    1. Emergency contact information for your school
    2. Checklist of all students and chaperones
    3. Emergency medical forms for all students and yourself
    4. Extra cash for emergency situations
    5. Contact information for Coyote Trails: name, phone number, and office location
    6. Trip itinerary
    7. Paper to write down ideas and questions that occur to you as you go
  • Have students leave headphones, MP3s, iPods, phones, and game devices at home/at school/on bus. Students will not be engaged. Remind students that it is disrespectful to use such devices, including cell phones, during the trip.
  • SAFETY! Immediately cover safety precautions with students (covered first thing when you arrive by instructors):
    1. What to do if someone gets lost or separated
    2. Buddy system
    3. Who to ask to use the restroom or get water
    4. What to do in case of a medical emergency or minor situation
    5. Remind them to follow the rules spoken to by the instructors
    6. Strangers in camp (CTNC and mountain campus are public areas)
    7. Inform instructors of any students with severe allergies or other medical conditions that are a potential hazard or need to be accommodated for.
Post Trip:
  • Consider checking our post-trip materials for ideas for post questions, surveys, tests, projects, and discussion questions. Also ask our contact about materials, resources, and further reading for students if you are interested.
  • Consider doing a group debrief in which students have a space to share their experiences. Whether it be in a project or a group discussion.
  • Do some written reflection for yourself about how the trip went.
    1. Where were the holes in your awareness?
    2. Were there things you could have done to better prepare?
    3. Did the instructors cover all the learning targets?
    4. Do students have remaining questions?
    5. Would you do the trip again?
    6. What were the highlights?
    7. What feedback would you give the instructors?
    8. Were your expectations realistic?
    9. Was this an overall effective trip? Why?
  • Send feedback to our office so that we may gain a better understanding of how our work has impacted the community, your students, and schools. This feedback helps us improve and can help us receive funding in the future!

If you have any questions during the trip planning process, contact our office or your program planning contact through email.

What can I expect from the Coyote Trails staff?2018-08-01T14:04:18+00:00

Coyote Trails staff has years of experience working with students ages 2 to 70 plus. All staff members receive proper background checks and have been ongoing participants within the Coyote Trails Programs. We are professional educators, naturalists, and business professionals. We are punctual, provide clear communication and are all open and caring individuals.

Staff members will work with you on a regular basis so that a personal relationship of trust and mentorship develops between staff and students. The Coyote Trails staff presents the skills for your students at a level that best meets their needs for learning and success. We are equally invested in the personal lives and goals of each individual student we work with.

Check out our staff here

What does Coyote Trails do in my classroom?2018-08-11T13:55:46+00:00
What to Expect from your Coyote Trails visit!

Coyote Trails is a unique experience even within the Outdoor environmental Education world. The following list provides you with an idea of what to expect from your CTSN program depending upon location. We provide an exceptional experience for every participant–including you! We encourage you to ask questions during your program coordination with your CTSN contact as well!

Coyote Trails comes to your school!
  • During coordination, your CTSN contact provides an Instructional Plan. We work with you to enable your program to fit your needs. Please provide learning targets, standards, and the academic language you are hoping to cover. Or ask to see what programs we presently offer that cover your school topics.
  • Please be available 15 minutes before the start of your program in order to coordinate with us on site as we need time to prep our materials prior to start time.
  • There is always an introduction to inspire students and prepare them to participate in the program. Safety and program logistics are outlined to orient all students. As Coyote Trails strives to maintain students “in the moment” – we ask you do not share the schedule with students prior to the program. Schedules are also subject to change based upon weather, location, materials available and the number of participants.
  • We provide a pre-survey to be completed prior to our visit. This pre-survey is designed to help us collect data on the students we serve, gain more information about the communities in which we work, and document the numbers of students we teach. This information aids in our grant research and helps us reach more school districts.
  • We work with you to design effective pre-test, pre-visit discussion questions and projects to help your students gain background knowledge and get excited about the educational topics. please work with your CTSN coordinator or see our Pre-planning resources.
  • We may have students fill out a worksheet during the program to help them document their experiences, record the information and keep them thinking about questions they have.
  • CTSN wants to maintain the burning fire! We offer post-trip resources such as project ideas, discussion/debrief prompts and post-tests!
  • Our school visits are usually set up in stations to keep an effective student to instructor ratio. There may be additional workshop time available to practice skills learned.
  • Each program has an introduction, instruction time, practice/skills time, debriefing time and a closing.
  • If you would like to purchase items for your class, such as t-shirts, stickers, bow drill kits or field guides, please let us know as early as possible so that the final cost can be added to your schools’ purchase order.
You’re visiting the Coyote Trails Nature Center!
  • The program begins immediately upon your arrival. Students are directed to the “Central Fire” to receive a safety brief and an introduction to get them both engaged and excited!
  • You are provided a supply list from your CTSN contact.
  • At least one instructor will orient you to teacher-specific topics and clarify for you any remaining questions.
  • Your class/group will be split into smaller groups in order to maintain an effective student to instructor ratio.
  • Depending upon the program length, it will include a break for lunch or a      snack that your students bring with them. Please pack out all trash and help maintain the Coyote Trails Nature Center grounds for the next class.
  • Following your program, there is school store/ “Coyote Den” (gift shop) time. If the students would like to make purchases, please obtain parental approval prior to your first Nature Center visit. Please let us know as early as possible if you wish to add instructional items to your class cost total, such as educational books, field guides, tshirts, bow drill kits, waterproof journals, fire starters or other items.
  • Coyote Trails is a developing Nature Center. Some of the grounds may be under development during your visit. We ask that your group be aware and to respect the delicate riparian zones. Remember you’re actually in someone’s home! Our efforts to make the CTNC more usable and inviting are strong and effective, but do take time. Check out what’s been happening and share with your students if you choose!
  • Other groups might be at the CTNC during your visit. It is open to the public and is frequented by Greenway users and other nature center visitors. Please remind students to be respectful when moving about the landscape.
You are on the way to Coyote Trails Mountain Campus!
  • The weather is 10 degrees cooler so please dress in layers and bring a sweater.
  • It’s a mountain, so bring shoes that you will be comfortable in all day suitable for hiking up and down hills. Please, no flip-flops, loose sandals or high heels.
  • Your program, depending upon length, will include time for a lunch or snack break that your students supply themselves. Please plan to pack out all the trash your students bring.
  • Your class/group will be split into smaller groups to help keep an effective student to instructor ratio.
  • The program starts immediately upon your arrival. Students will be directed to the “Central Fire” for a safety talk and an introduction to get everyone oriented and excited!
  • At least one instructor will meet with you to review any up to date teacher-specific areas of focus and to answer remaining questions.
  • The land is open to the public; however, our main Coyote Trails campus is private.
  • There are typically full-time caretakers part of a four-season long class, living on the mountain and in the main camp. This is their home, so please be courteous.
  • This is also the home of many, many wild animals, plants, and fungi. Please, be courteous.
  • IIf the students would like to make purchases, please obtain parental approval prior to your arrival and do let us know as early as possible. We can arrange to add difficult to locate instructional items to your class cost total, such as educational books, field guides, t-shirts, bow drill kits, waterproof journals, fire starters or other items.
  • Be sure to calculate your travel time. Our mountain campus takes about an hour to drive, park and walk into from the Medford/Phoenix, Oregon area.
What education classes do you offer?2018-08-01T14:40:15+00:00

We offer a wide variety of programs for schools of all grade levels. All of our classes are hands-on and give students an opportunity to learn valuable life skills, play outdoors, and increase their understanding of their environment and core academic standards.

Although we have a list of suggested program options on our Education Programs page, all of our programs are customizable and can be applied in all areas of study. The length of our programs varies with each class, ranging from 90-minute programs to full-day field trips as well as recurring teaching partnerships that involve multiple classroom visits and field trips.

All of our school programs align with state and federal standards. To discuss your program needs, contact our office at 541-772-1390, or office@coyotetrails.org.

Our classes focus upon traditional living skills, tracking, and awareness. You choose the specific content area, topics and learning objectives that will best meet your specific class needs. Many of our courses meet standards in all content areas simultaneously! We work with you to design programs that are both engaging and educational. Contact us with questions or to start planning your visit with Coyote Trails!

What should we bring on our field trip?2018-08-01T16:49:53+00:00

These lists provide a general idea of what a typical class requires. A specific supply list will be sent to you during pre-planning that we design for your unique program. Ahead of time, think about how many chaperones you may need and find out who is available. We do have Pre-Class Tips for Chaperones. The Program Coordinator at Coyote Trails can discuss all of these topics with you and give recommendations.

Supply List for CTNC visit (*varies based on program and student ages)

  • Pencils
  • Worksheet from CTSN or a journal
  • Weather appropriate clothing and shoes
  • Sack lunch for each student
    • Pack-out trash bag: We ask that all your trash be “packed-out”.
  • CTSN “Student Permission Slip” signed by parent/guardian
  • Completed Pre-surveys
  • Water Bottle – mandatory for every program
  • Spending money for “Coyote Den” (gift shop/school store), with parental approval

Typical Supply List for School visit (*varies based on program and student ages)

  • Pencils
  • Journals/worksheets
  • Pre-surveys
  • Weather appropriate clothing
  • CTSN student permission to participate slip
  • Water bottle

Typical Supply List for Mountain Campus (*varies based on program and student ages)

  • Water Bottle – mandatory
  • Pencils
  • Journal/worksheet
  • CTSN student permission to participate slip
  • Pre-surveys
  • Appropriate clothing and shoes (always colder here than on the Valley floor)
  • Sack lunch
    • Pack-out bag for all student-generated trash
What supplies do we need for a great experience?2018-08-01T16:50:57+00:00

As an outdoor-based educational non-profit, all the supplies we usually use can be found in the dirt! Coyote Trails encourages its students to keep a journal to track their experiences outside. We may request that students have journals (even a few pieces of bound paper) when we visit or they attend a field trip to our nature center.

If you’d like to include a journaling aspect to your students’ work with CT, let us know, and we will tailor our visit to try to meet that need as well.

Any observation tools can be handy. Binoculars, weather trackers, field guides, etc. can help students with questions, and aid those who just want to learn by allowing them to access more information and dive deeper into their curiosity! If you’d like to borrow these materials or purchase them from us, let us know and we will do our best to provide.

What supplies will I want to have in my classroom after the field trip?2018-08-01T16:52:31+00:00

As an outdoor-based educational non-profit, all the supplies we usually use can be found in the dirt! Coyote Trails encourages its students to keep a journal to track their experiences outside. We may request that students have journals (even a few pieces of bound paper) when we visit or they attend a field trip to our nature center.

If you’d like to include a journaling aspect to your students’ work with CT, let us know, and we will tailor our visit to try to meet that need as well.

Any observation tools can be handy. Binoculars, weather trackers, field guides, etc. can help students with questions, or who just want to learn more, access more information and dive deeper! If you’d like to borrow these materials or purchase them from us, let us know and we will do our best to provide!

What things can we do prior to our CT experience to enhance our learning?2018-08-02T15:24:26+00:00
Some Tips for Successful Pre-Planning:
  • Identify and clearly state your learning targets. This will help you get comfortable with your own class’ needs and get you thinking about what background knowledge would be helpful to your students. Check with the Program Coordinator at Coyote Trails for additional pre-assessment tools and introductory materials.
  • Work with the Program Coordinator at CT and discuss possible pre-survey/pre-test questions that will get students wondering about the topic and questioning their own understanding of the background knowledge.
  • Consider having students draft 2-5 questions they already have about the topic before the day of the trip/visit. Challenge them to have the answers to all their questions before leaving the site.
  • Discuss your expectations of behavior and learning before the trip. Consider having students come up with the conduct guidelines. If the trip will have a related project afterward, give the students the rubric before the trip to get them thinking.
  • Remind students to wear appropriate clothing! Outdoor Education means outdoors. We will be out in the field in rain, shine, or snow. Nature is great to experience when it’s sunny, but there is an incredible amount to learn from rainy and chilly weather too!
  • Also provide students with a packing list. Water bottles, lunches & snacks, extra shoes, school store (aka the Coyote Den) money, journal, pencils, and worksheets are all common things students could need and might forget.
  • Prepare chaperones for their role. While they should engage in the activities, chaperones should be prepared to assist in transitioning students, helping facilitate restroom and lunch breaks, doing head counts, and being overall responsible for the well-being of their groups. Let them know your needs as a teacher before the trip.
Be able to identify all of the following for yourself and to your administration:
  • Learning outcomes for the trip
  • Standards alignment
  • Essential concepts underlying the content and structure of the trip
  • Key vocabulary that will be a part of the trip
  • Who are the chaperones?
  • Cost of trip and how it is funded
Talking to your contact at Coyote Trails

Prior to your in-class visit or field trip to Coyote Trails, you will work with our Program Coordinator. This person will serve as your communication channel into CT for your trip planning and post-trip time.

  • Use vocabulary, terms, academic language, and ideas from your learning targets so that we can use them when talking with students. Mention them directly if they are essential.
  • Make sure your contact knows that you are aiming to meet standards, and provide them early in the planning of your class.
  • Give and receive detailed time information: length of program, bus schedule, departure and arrival times, etc.
  • We may also request that students fill out a pre-assessment sheet with questions that will help us get an idea of each individual student’s usual interactions with the outdoors or the specific skill(s) we will be instructing. Getting these back to us ahead of time will help instructors tailor the already differentiated programs for your class(es).
  • If you think there is anything from your discussion with your students you’d like to share with us or any concerns about accessibility, please send that along too.

We suggest also having your students spend some quiet time outside. Consider having students survey their backyards, fields nearby, or the trees outside your classroom window. Just sitting alone outside can prepare students for their visit with Coyote Trails.

Contact us with any questions you may have or to get started on your trip planning!

What will my students learn that connects to State curriculum standards?2018-08-01T14:24:40+00:00

Coyote Trails tailors every class visit and field trip to meet certain Common Core National Standards and state standards. Each program is different and can be designed to fit into your regular units, classroom vocabulary targets, and overarching themes in most cases.

Working with the Program Coordinator at Coyote Trails is the best way to plan an effective trip that meets your class’s needs.

While you’re considering a visit from or to Coyote Trails, keep in mind that we emphasize hands-on, experiential learning and inquiry-based learning. We call this Coyote Teaching. Known by many other names, Coyote Teaching is at the forefront of experience-based and outdoor education.

If you are interested in our approach to teaching and the type of activities, we recommend the book Coyote’s Guide to Connecting with Nature: For Kids of All Ages & Their Mentors, by Jon Young. It is a thorough and well thought out guide to help you continue the lessons in your classroom while still being able to meet all necessary state standards.

Why teach with Coyote Trails?2018-08-01T16:54:39+00:00

Field trips have been a vital part of education since humans have existed. Experiencing the “real world” allows students to connect to the ideas in the classroom as well as provide a new environment in which to process their own understanding. Now while field trips facilitate natural study and are super fun and effective, they can be overwhelming to plan, pay for, and follow up on.

So why do it?

Schools today are under more pressure than ever to produce Annual Yearly Progress or chance losing what little funding they already receive from the government. In an effort to support teachers in their heroic efforts to teach, inspire, and serve the students in their care, partnering with CT also means teachers will get first-hand training which will bolster their academic toolbox with strategies and curriculum that will bring relevant and functional learning to the classrooms. The beauty is that the classroom here is OUTDOORS.

The growing majority of our country’s youth and teens are rarely encouraged to explore nature through consistent time spent outside, free from the routines and patterns of everyday indoor life. As our future leaders grow more disconnected from the natural world, their sense of earth stewardship remains undeveloped. This is scientifically supported through Richard Louv’s book “Last Child in The Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder.”

Coyote Trails School of Nature opens the door of opportunity for students to experience a nature-based curriculum and discover both unique and individual personal insights. Nature reflects to us the impact of our everyday choices and how small simple actions make significant changes. This, in turn, results in a heightened awareness of the interconnectedness and interdependence of all life. By reintroducing this personal relationship with nature the student experiences a greater understanding and appreciation of self. Students of all ages and abilities develop a newfound sense of confidence, communication skills, artistic and creative expression, empathy and compassion, and a true sense of freedom to explore.

Students today live in a world of constant motion…school, carpools, piano, soccer, video games, and iPhones. Coyote Trails wants to share this nature-based program with teachers as a strategy that augments their academic curriculums with a powerful life skills opportunity.